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STUDY HIGH SCHOOL GERMANY

High School in Germany ✔ Orientation in Hamburg ✔ Language course provided ✔ Modern, cosmopolitan country and low crime rate ✔ Weekend trips ✔ European tour Germany has about 82 million inhabitants. It is the biggest country in the EU in terms of population. Germany is a modern, cosmopolitan country. German schooling is based on […]

STUDY HIGH SCHOOL GERMANY

High School in Germany

✔ Orientation in Hamburg
✔ Language course provided
✔ Modern, cosmopolitan country and low crime rate
✔ Weekend trips
✔ European tour

Germany has about 82 million inhabitants. It is the biggest country in the EU in terms of population. Germany is a modern, cosmopolitan country. German schooling is based on nine years of compulsory education for all children. Attendance of all government schools is free of charge.

In Germany there is everything, from beautiful scenery and cosy villages to modern cities and charming Christmas markets. The mixture of old and ultra modern is exciting. You learn the German language and meet German society and culture.

Like in many European countries there is no typical family structure in Germany anymore. Host familes are friendly and open for new cultures. They live in smaller towns or suburbs of bigger cities all over the country.

 

Accommodation

 

• Both parents work. Traditional families, single parents, “patchwork families”.

• Student should build his or her own social life and finds own hobbies.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Country Information Area:
357,021 square kilometers
Population: 82,3 million
Capital: Berlin Language:
German National holiday: October, 3rd
 
 
 
Germany has about 82 million inhabitants. It is the largest country in the EU in terms of population. Germany is a modern, cosmopolitan country. Its society is shaped by a plurality of life styles and a true ethno-cultural diversity. Forms of coexistence have become more varied, and the scope individuals enjoy has become greater. Traditional gender roles have been dispensed with. Despite the social changes, the family remains the most important social reference unit. Each of the 16 German federal states has its own fascinating landscapes, tourist attractions and culinary delights. There is, for example, Bavaria, the “beer state” with its “Oktoberfest”, Neuschwanstein Castle and the magnificent Alpine scenery that attract more foreign tourists than any other federal state.
 
 
 
With more than 2000 lakes, numerous waterways and lush green in between, Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania looks particularly attractive.
 
 
 
Together with its 350-kilometer-long Baltic coastline, this Northeastern state is the major venue for water sports enthusiasts in the whole of Central Europe. Germany has a large number of cities: Cologne, with its Gothic cathedral; Bonn, the Federal Republic’s first capital city; Düsseldorf, the fashion-conscious state capital. Berlin, which is a federal state on its own, is Germany’s capital. Until 1990 Berlin was divided into a western and eastern part by a wall that can still be visited at some places.
 
 
 
Germany has a lot to offer, such as great cuisine, sports, relaxing nature, festivals, cultural celebrations, holiday resorts, design, fashion, inspiring architecture, art as well as many other spare time activities for teenagers. In other words, Germany does not only offer clichés as “lederhosen” and “sauerkraut”. Germany shares the same basic features of its political system with most members of the European Union (EU). Its system of government is one of parliamentary democracy.
 
 
 
In other words, government policy is determined by the head of government and the ministers, and not by the head of state. Daimler, Siemens, Porsche, Lufthansa, SAP. In the international arena German companies have an excellent reputation.
 
 
 
They represent “Made in Germany”, known as a seal of quality all over the world. They represent innovation, quality and cutting edge technology. Yet the world’s third largest economy does not consist solely of global players, but also of numerous world market leaders who are actually small and medium-sized enterprises, the powerhouse of the German economy.
 
 
 
Several international influences have made their mark on German cuisine. Of course you can still enjoy heavy regional cuisine, the hearty characteristics of the different landscapes such as roasted pork with dumplings from Bavaria or ribs and “sauerkraut” from Hesse. But Germans have become far more varied and health-conscious. This new trend towards healthy eating has lead to increased sales of organic food. Organic supermarkets are opening up in large cities all over the country, offering a blend of what is becoming increasingly important to Germans, enjoyment and responsibility, lifestyle and a clear conscience.
 
 
 
School life
 
Good initial opportunities for everyone are a key prerequisite for education and achievement. German schooling is based on nine years of compulsory education for all children. Attendance of all government schools is free of charge. However there is a growing number of private, tuition-based schools in Germany as well. Once children are aged six, they generally attend primary school for four years, before going on to a variety of secondary schools: Hauptschule, Realschule, Gesamtschule, Gymnasium.
 
The standards and the balance between practical and theroretical subjects vary between the different types of secondary schools, and so does the number of school years. Gymnasium provides in-depth education and most exchange students attend this type of school. Pupils graduate from Gymnasium after the 12th grade, receiving a high school certificate necessary for studying at university.
 
School in Germany is from Monday till Friday. There are two school semesters. The 1st semester starts in summer and ends in January, the second semester runs from January till June or July, sometimes August since every federal state has its own vacation times.
 
There is usually two weeks of holiday in the autumn, two weeks in the winter and two weeks in the spring. The main holiday is during the summer. and lasts for about six weeks. Exchange students will attend a public school and are placed in grade 9, 10 or 11. Every school decides which grade the exchange student will attend. Students usually have to take compulsory classes such as maths, German, English, social science, natural science and physical education. In addition students can choose, among other subjects like music, arts, computer science etc, depending on what the school offers. In German schools students have the opportunity to learn English, French, Spanish and Latin.
 
There is a large number of exchange organizations in Germany that want to place students. Public schools do not receive any money for enrolling exchange students; they welcome foreign students just for the cultural interest and international experience. If the student has a special request, he or she should contact the BFME office or the area representative. Special requests might be possible, but BFME can not guarantee this. Placements in Private Schools, incl.
 
Boarding Schools, (additional fees apply!) are also an option in Germany. School transportation varies. Many students can ride their bikes to school if they live close or some can even walk. If it is too far, students will use public transportation or go by school bus which they need to pay for themselves. Students are strongly urged to become involved in extra-curricular activities outside of school such as sports, clubs, social events, art, music, or drama, as long as these activities do not interfere with their academic progress. In Germany these activities are outside of the school arena.